A LITTLE SAMPLER OF LIFE

 

cross_stitch_samplers

Elizabeth Willis Barrett………October 19, 2014

When I was little, I went to Primary—faithfully.  I usually walked.  Once I called my Aunt Mona and asked her to take me but she said no.  It wasn’t that far and she knew I could easily walk it in about seven minutes.  Mom was at work or I certainly wouldn’t have asked Aunt Mona.  She would have felt really badly if I had been kidnapped on the way.  I think.  I never tried the Aunt Mona avenue of travel again.  I loved Primary.  We’d have opening exercises and then go into classes.

Do you think that in the hereafter we will get our full memories back?  Because right now I can’t remember sitting in class.  I easily remember that one of my Primary teachers was killed in a terrible car accident.  I can still feel a deep sorrow with that memory.  That was the first time I learned that someone in MY church could die unexpectedly.  I was pretty sheltered.  Anyway it was a terrible blow to her family and to all of us who knew her.  It shook my faith.  So God doesn’t always protect you even when you pray every day, “…….and let no harm or accident befall us”?

I just read on the Internet (and how could that ever be wrong?) that nine, ten and eleven year old Primary girls became LiHoMas.  And all this long while, I thought we were called Liahonas, named after the golden instrument of direction found by Lehi in the desert in the Book of Mormon.  But nope!  I guess we were LiHoMas which stood for Little Home Makers.  Whew!  I like Liahonas much better!

To be more specific, the nine year old girls were named Larks, the ten year old girls were named Bluebirds and the eleven year old girls were named Seagulls.  The most significant thing from Primary that I remember is making a sampler.  I really need to find mine so I can scan it and let you see it.  It is a real work of art.  I still remember what was so carefully stitched onto that sampler in cross stitch of various colors:

Greet the Day With a Song

Make Others Happy

Serve Gladly

My friend Louise and I used to work on our samplers together once in awhile.  I was a very tall LiHoMa and she was a small one.  Once she wanted to work on our samplers in a top cupboard in their guest room.  Why?  I don’t know!  But my body didn’t quite fold as well as hers did and that experience might have added to my extreme claustrophobia.

I am proud of myself for getting my sampler completed at all since many craft projects like that never make it to finé. Maybe the finishing of it gave me an extra doodad on my bandlo which I thought was called a bandalo—a felt thing you wore around your neck like a long collar.   Neither of those words is in the dictionary, by the way.  Interesting what you can learn on the internet.  My whole childhood could be changed if I’m not careful of what I look up.

Anyway, aren’t those wonderful words?  The words on my sampler, I mean.

Tomorrow I’m going to try to put them into practice and see what happens.

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5 comments on “A LITTLE SAMPLER OF LIFE

  1. Carma says:

    Thanks for reminding me of my primary days. I know exactly where my bandalo is and my sampler is there too I am also claustrophobic, but I don’t know why. Good to read your thoughts Keep writing.

  2. Doreen says:

    My sampler is framed and can be seen in the kitchen if you know where to look. It is not very well done. It could have looked better and been much easier to stitch if we had known about counted cross stitch. But I guess my parents were proud of my work because they framed it. It is a reminder of worthy goals though. Your story revived memories – knitting and crocheting while our teacher read from a book. Thanks Liz.

  3. I have looked everywhere for my sampler so I could show a picture of it but it has gone AWOL in this house that needs a good purging!

  4. Mary Ann Arnett Price says:

    My red, yellow and blue sampler is proudly displayed in the laundry room, in case I forget that mundane duties, like laundry, are small acts of service and can be done with a smile and a song. My bandalo, though a tad moth-eaten, is hanging in my office and reminds me of those basic truths and values that shaped our lives. So grateful…I believe we were the last of the Larks, Bluebirds and Seagulls.

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