A Letter to Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs

 

Dear Steve,

How are you doing?  Are you liking it up there?  Hope it’s up there.  You’ve probably already rattled the big brass and let them know that you’re not going to put up with any imperfection–which, I think, is the general admonition of heaven anyway.

I’m reading your book–listening to your book.  Listening is such a better use of time. Walter Isaacson did an excellent job of writing it.  I wish he’d left out a lot of the words that sizzle my ears, but it is definitely worth the read–the listen.

As I sit here at my MacBook Pro to write this, I marvel at the insight and foresight you had to meet my particular needs.  I can carry this computer with me everywhere.  Right now I’m sitting in my bedroom in my favorite chair with it on my lap.  As I write, I get notices of any e-mails coming in–my connection to many people who, in the past, would have had to walk to a phone, stand there as they dialed my number, perhaps grimaced at a busy signal and then gone back to their work only to try again, perhaps with the same result.  Now they can e-mail me a message that can be sent to numerous people at the same time and each of us can read it at our own leisure. Not that anyone really has much leisure.  Also, without getting up, I can look up words on the thesaurus, check the weather, review my calendar, keep track of my finances and Skype my daughter in China.

Besides my laptop, what I really, really, want to thank you for is my IPhone which has become my constant companion.  I can be listening to a book on my IPhone with my Apple headset and when a phone call beeps in, I just touch the switch on the headset and I can talk to the caller.   Then I touch the headset’s button to end the call and my book starts playing again.  What a gift to someone like me!

In the past I would have been listening to a book through a headset hooked to a bulky CD player worn around my waist in a special holder.  My portable home phone would have been hooked to my waistband with a different headset attached. When the phone rang, I would have to turn off the CD player, take the headset out of my ears, put the phone headset in my ear and answer the phone.  I felt like a quick draw artist.

And the Apple Store–I love the Apple Store!  I know it took some doing to bring that vision to frution.  When I get frazzled and the finer points of needed technology zoom over my head like a B-22, I can sign up for a class or a One to One Session and get my questions answered while working on my particular project.  My project–not someone else’s that means nothing to me.  And I can sign up on my own phone in moments.  I don’t have to look up a number or talk to anyone or wait while someone can look up the availability of the class.  The organization of the whole place is astounding.

Your book didn’t portray you as a kind, gentle person, but geniuses can’t be all things to all people.  I don’t suppose Mozart had a serene and compassionate personality either.  I wouldn’t have lasted even two seconds in your presence.  You would have said I was “________” and I would have withered like my garden did in the last freeze.  We have all benefited by those who could stand up to you, though.  You needed them and they probably haven’t been given nearly enough credit for all the marvelous products created by Apple.

Your life wasn’t quite as long as you would have hoped but you accomplished so much.  Not only did your perseverance, hard work and innovation make a dent in the Universe as was your goal, I believe, but you changed my world–my own personal world and for that I thank you!

With gratitude,

Elizabeth W. Barrett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One comment on “A Letter to Steve Jobs

  1. nancy Proffitt says:

    Well said!

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